+1-757-224-0177      Choose Language














Select Your Language


Online SupportPhone Support

Australia Receives Systems Recognition with U.S. FDA

As of April 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officially recognizes the Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources as having a comparable Food Safety System, granting it systems recognition.  Australia is the third country to make this arrangement with FDA—the first being New Zealand in 2012, and the second being Canada in 2016.

This recognition allows importation of Australian-produced foods into the United States without the extensive requirements imposed by FSMA’s Foreign Supplier Verification Program.  Instead of conducting detailed hazard analyses and verification activities as is required from food from other countries, U.S. importers now may simply verify that the producing firm is in good standing with the Australian Department for that type of product.

What is Systems Recognition?

Systems recognition is an arrangement where FDA agrees upon a similarity between its own Food Safety System and that of another country seeking this arrangement, where both provide similar protection and monitoring of food products. The concept is based upon the idea that Food Safety Systems adhering to similar standards will produce similar outcomes—ideally the production of safe food.

What are the Benefits of Being Recognized by FDA?

FDA’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) introduced extensive new food safety regulations for both food facilities and U.S. importers of food products. While still subject to FSMA, food facilities in recognized countries and domestic importers of food manufactured in recognized countries benefit from modified requirements.  As more faith is granted to the Food Safety Systems of recognized countries, these parties may see less FDA intervention as a result.

Under FSMA, food facilities that manufacture, process, pack, or hold food for U.S. consumption are required by FDA to have written food safety plans.  One component of this plan is a supply-chain program that mandates facilities to conduct verification activities on their suppliers, such as onsite audits.  As opposed to conducting these audits themselves, facilities with suppliers in recognized countries are able to verify suppliers through an inspection conducted by that country’s food safety authority within one year of the required audit date, potentially saving resources on travel and personal expenses.

FSMA also requires U.S. importers to create a Foreign Supplier Verification Program (FSVP) for each of their foreign suppliers, involving hazard analysis, risk evaluation, supplier verification, and corrective action.  Systems recognition allows importers to forgo certain aspects of the FSVP rule, such as hazard analysis and verification, as long as they continue to monitor and find that each supplier is compliant with its country’s Food Safety System.  As a result, importers are able to save time and effort as well as travel expenses when importing food from recognized countries. This may provide facilities in recognized countries an advantage over competition, as US importers may be more apt to import from facilities that require less work under FSVP.

Use Registrar Corp’s free FSMA Wizard for information on how FSMA rules affect your specific country and facility.

How Does a Country Become Recognized?

In order to meet systems recognition, a country’s governmental Food Safety System must undergo a review of its compliance history by FDA. The Agency will examine data on past refusals of admission, import alerts from products originating in that country, and other areas of concern.  Following this review, the interested country will hold a consultation with FDA to outline its goals for achieving systems recognition and the steps that need to be taken to move forward in this process.

If the country is still interested in becoming recognized after the consultation, its regulatory agency or authority must complete the International Comparability Assessment Tool (ICAT) to determine whether or not its Food Safety System meets ten standards outlined by FDA.  Upon its completion, FDA will review the ICAT along with the data collected during the initial review.  If deemed that the interested country satisfies these standards, FDA will take the steps toward arranging an in-country assessment of the country’s system to attempt to finalize the systems recognition process.

Can I Still Export To The US If My Country Is Not Recognized?

While there are benefits to being recognized, systems recognition is entirely voluntary and is not required to export food to the United States.  A company interested in exporting food to the U.S. must still complete all of the steps necessary for complying with FDA regulations.

If you represent a company looking to export or import food to the United States, Registrar Corp can assist in complying with FDA’s requirements promptly and correctly.  For more information on FDA requirements or Registrar Corp’s services, please call +1-757-224-0177.  Additionally, 24-hour live chat assistance is available at www.registrarcorp.com/livehelp.

 





Search Registrar Corp

View Our Locations


Choose Your Language